Browse Tag: tips

2020 Father’s day Gift Guide

There are all types of Dads in this world. The loving Dad, the stern Dad, the Dad of a few words, the Dad who embarrasses you in front of your crush. no matter what type of Dad you have, he still deserves the best, so, give him the best. We have a list of great Father’s Day gift ideas for any Dad.  

  • John Deere Weber Grill for the Dad who loves to cook!  

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  • A lawnmower, for the man who just wants his mower to start and run. Nothing runs like a Deere. 

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  • Stihl products for the man who edges, weed eats, blows off the driveway or, pretends to be a lumberjack.  

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  • Gun Safe for the Dad, who has a valuable collection. Girls, this is a great one because the guns can be locked up when you bring home your new boyfriend.  

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  • Tool Box full of goodies for new Dad, who has no clue what he is doing but needs to start somewhere 

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  • A Gator for the dad who loves going for an evening drive. 

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  • Gift Certificate for the hard to shop for Dad. 

 

No matter what type of Dad you may have, Shoppa’s has everything he wants or needs. Stop by any of our 8 locations and get a gift your Dad will love. If you have any other great Father’s Day gift ideas, let us know in the comments below. 

 

Stay Safe During Harvest

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As the pace of harvest season starts to pick up, farmers may start to get in a rush. Whether it is because of rain, limited amount of combines or too many fields ready all at once, harvest is fast pace and long hours. However, rushing through harvest can be dangerous. There are multiple types of hazards that could cause injury including:

  • Being entangled in with the leveling or discharge augers.
  • Falling from the combine
  • Hitting low powerlines, bridges, and other hazards
  • Being run over
  • Coming into contact with the knife, reel or stripper rotor
  • Coming into contact with the straw chopper or spreader
  • Being trapped under the header/injured by the header falling from its transport trailer
  • Being injured by driving mechanisms
  • Dust
  • Fires
  • Noise

The list goes on and on. With the number of hazards for potential injuries, you still have to get those crops harvested. So here are some of our tips to keep you safe during harvest.

  • Set aside time to properly prepare the combine for harvest. – Checking your combine before harvest can save you time and money. Check and repair anything that could be a hazard to you and others, including loose latter platforms, handrails, steps, missing safety covers and access panels. Don’t have time or the proper equipment to check your combine? Have Shoppa’s service do it for you!
  • Always clean and do a safety check of the combine before using.  – Check and see if tires need air, handrails and steps are secured properly and that safety covers are on.
  • Use hand signals when communicating to the driver of the combine. –  Using hand signals can let the driver of the combine know what is happening on the ground. If you are on the ground, keep your distance from combine when moving because the driver may not see you.
  • Wear clothes that fits snugly – Wearing fitted clothing can reduce the risk of your clothes catching in moving parts.
  • Try not to move your combines at night from field to field.  – Though there may be less traffic, it may cause potential hazards. If you have to move your combine at night, make sure that all your lights, flashers, and rotary beacon is on and working properly. That way other vehicle can see you and drive carefully near you.
  • Be careful when applying brakes – A combine may tip forward due to the header’s weight if the brakes are applied to quickly.
  • Watch for low objects – low power lines, bridges, buildings and any other obstacles can run the risk of the combine hitting them. Also, examine the field for hazards such as washouts and other potential surprises.

Though accidents happen, we want to make sure that you, your family and your employees are safety this harvest season. That is why we highly suggest proper instruction on safety for individuals who will be around during harvest. Not only having your employees, but your family being safe during harvest could prevent future injuries. Though these are just a few tips, we highly suggest checking out these resources for more safety tips.

Have a happy and safe harvest season!

How to Keep Your Home Mosquito-Free

Everything is bigger in Texas. Unfortunately, that includes the mosquitoes. The Gulf Coast region is especially prone to dense mosquito populations. The summer is peak mosquito season, which means it’s time to start taking extra measures to manage exposure as much as possible.

Take a look around your house. Is your property a haven for mosquitoes? If your home is hospitable to mosquitoes, it can easily become a breeding ground for them, creating more and more of the pesky insects.

To deter mosquito breeding, drain any standing water. Most species of mosquitoes lay their eggs in stagnant water.

Stagnant water can gather in:

  • Discarded tires
  • Ditches or trenches
  • Industrial containers
  • Clogged storm drains
  • Natural low points on your property
  • Pottery
  • The saucers under flowerpots
  • Trash and litter, such as aluminum cans
  • Garbage can lids

If you have a swimming pool, cover it when not in use and keep it clean and chlorinated. Ornamental pools should be aerated to keep water moving, which deters mosquitoes from laying eggs. You can also stock the pond with fish that eat mosquitoes. Items that are supposed to contain water, such as birdbaths and pet water bowls, should be dumped out and have fresh water added at least twice a week.

Once you have the standing water taken care of, it’s time to bring out your John Deere mower! Mowing your yard regularly and keeping weeds away from your home’s foundation helps make your yard less hospitable to mosquitoes. Another thing you can do is replace your outdoors lights with yellow “bug” lights. They don’t repel insects, but mosquitoes and other pests aren’t as attracted to them, making them less likely to take over your yard. And don’t forget to keep an eye on your window and door screens to make sure there are no gaps or holes that need repairing.

If your area is extremely prone to mosquitoes, you will likely have to be even more proactive. You may want to consider one of the insecticides available for homeowners. A light spray around building foundations, shrubs and grasses will keep mosquitoes from resting in those areas.

There are several solutions for dealing with mosquitoes, but there are a couple of things that aren’t worth the money. Bug zappers are not recommended for mosquito control. Mosquitoes usually make up for less than 1% of bugs zapped, and many beneficial bugs get shocked instead. Citrosa plants are another item that experts say won’t help. While citronella oil has mosquito-repellant properties, the plants don’t.

Now that you have some ideas, get out there and battle with those mosquitoes! Mosquito control isn’t just beneficial to you and your family, it helps your whole community. Working together with your neighbors to get rid of as many mosquitoes as possible will help keep your community healthier and happier!

Preparing for Flooding

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By now, if you haven’t personally been affected by the Texas floods, you’ve at least heard about them and the devastating results. With the frequency of heavy rains and flash floods recently, it’s important to be prepared for anything. If you live in or near an affected area, do you have a plan in place for all flood-related situations?

The first thing is to understand just how powerful flood waters can be. Just six inches of moving water can knock you down, and two feet of water can sweep your vehicle away. Everyone knows the saying “turn around, don’t drown.” It’s true. Don’t risk driving or walking through water, because even a little bit of water can easily displace a car or pull along a person.

Flash floods, which is a flood caused by heavy or excessive rainfall in a short period of time, are the #1 cause of weather-related deaths in the U.S. They can develop in a matter of minutes and have the power to uproot trees, destroy buildings and bridges, carry away vehicles with ease and much more.

Avoiding flash floods:

  • If you live or are visiting in a vulnerable area, monitor a radio, television and/or phone for weather alerts
  • If there is a chance of flash flooding, get to higher ground immediately
  • Avoid camping or parking along streams, rivers and creeks during heavy rainfall. These areas can flood quickly, with little warning

Paying attention to weather alerts is important in helping you decide what steps to take in the event of a possible flood. Emergency weather services will typically issue one of two warnings: A flood watch or a flood warning.

Flood watch:

  • A flood watch means “be aware” – conditions are right for flooding to occur in your area
  • Turn on your TV or radio, and keep a charged cell phone nearby to receive the latest weather updates and emergency instructions
  • Know where to go – in the event you do have to leave, have a plan for reaching higher ground quickly and on foot
  • Have an emergency kit that includes a flashlight, batteries, cash and first aid supplies
  • Prepare your home by bringing in outdoor furniture and moving important items to the highest floor possible to protect them from potential flood damage. Disconnect electrical appliances and do not touch electrical equipment if you’re wet or standing in water. If instructed, turn off your gas or electricity at a main switch or valve – this helps prevent fires and explosions

Flood warning:

  • A flood warning means “take action” – flooding is either happening or will happen shortly
  • Move immediately to higher ground or stay on higher ground
  • Evacuate if directed

What happens if you don’t get out of your car or house in time and waters start rising around you? The most important thing is not to panic. Call 911 and alert them to your situation and location. Always be aware of where you are – if you’re in a car, know what road you on. If you’re vacationing, memorize the address of where you are staying.

If you’re in a car:

  • If you get stuck in rising flood waters while in your car, take off your seatbelt and remove jackets and outer clothing. Turn on headlights and hazard lights, which will make it easier for emergency personnel to see you
  • If the waters a rising and threatening to submerge your car, first try rolling down the windows and escaping from the car
  • If the automatic windows don’t work, remain calm and wait for the water to fill the car, at least until neck level. At that point, you will be able to open the door and escape
  • Once out, do not stay with your car or stand on the roof of your car. If it’s swept away, the car will carry you with it
  • Get to high ground immediately

If you’re in a house:

  • If you’re in a house during a flash flood and water starts to get inside, don’t try to leave the house
  • Call 911 for rescue
  • Get as high as you can without getting yourself stuck. If the attic doesn’t have a window or escape route, stay on the second floor or the highest point with a window or way to escape in case you need to get on the roof

What do you do if the worst happens?

If you’re swept away in a flood, there are still important measures to take:

  • Try to make sure your feet are pointed downstream
  • Make every effort to direct your body over obstacles instead of under them
  • Try to steer your way to a building or higher ground so that you can get out of the water

Hopefully these are tips you never have to use, but it’s important to be prepared, because flooding can happen quickly and unexpectedly.

Stay safe, and share your tips with us in the comments or on our social media pages!